Susan Hart asks…should you go vegan?

The subject of veganism is appearing more regularly in the media; Lewis Hamilton is the latest big name to follow in the footsteps of Serena and Venus Williams and adopt a vegan lifestyle.

Vegetarian and vegan inspired cafes, pubs, restaurants are springing up all around the country – we have a plethora of them here in Nottingham – number 12 hounds gate, Robe room, Peacock, horse and plough, bingham, Oscar and Rosies, angel microbrewery,cafe roya, Crocus cafe to name but a few.

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And of course I offer vegan cookery lessons in West Bridgford for those who wish to dip their toe in to vegan waters or for anyone that wants to incorporate more veggies in to their diet

Being vegan means not consuming any animal products or by-products.  Obviously that means no meat, fish, dairy and eggs.  For some it also means no honey.  They will also not wear leather or fur.  For many it is also more than just food, it’s a lifestyle choice centred around animal welfare, ethical treatment of animals and people and the conservation of the planet

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Here’s just some of the vegan food on offer in our Nottingham eateries

5 reason why its worth considering

1. Vegans and vegetarians generally have a lower BMI (Body Mass Index),  which can lead to a reduced risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

2. Eating a more plant based diet means more antioxidants and phytochemicals which help fight free radicals and reduce inflammation; high levels of both could lead to an increase in chronic diseases like arthritis, heart disease and some cancers

3. Getting your 5-a-day.  Nearly two thirds of adults don’t manage to eat their recommended 5 fruits and/or vegetables a day.  These multicoloured powerhouses give us fibre, vitamins and minerals and help to stabilise our blood sugar levels

 

4. Reduced food costs?  A tin of beans costing 50p has up to 10g of protein.  Buying fruits and veg when in season makes them more affordable they also contain optimum nutrition.  Dried beans and lentils can be bought in bulk.  Frozen fruits and vegetables are nutritionally equal to fresh and are often more convenient. Many fruits and veg can be obtained free of charge from local allotments, friends and family or by growing your own.

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5. And we can’t get away from animal welfare, global warming and sustaining the planet.

If you want to take the plunge but don’t know where to start then consider attending my vegan cookery classes that run weekly on most days (except Thursdays) and a Tuesday evening

So come along and make something new and nutritious

Contact me on 07946 301338 or susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk

A vegan diet can be naturally lower in calcium, vitamin D, iron, vitamin B12, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids.  But with some careful meal planning vegans can incorporate these micronutrients into their diet.

Marmite and soya (B12), Mushrooms and sunshine (Vitamin D), Flaxseeds (Omega 3), Green leafy Veg and pulses (Iron), citrus/dried fruits and sesame seeds (calcium) and Tofu, nuts and seeds (*zinc)

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Vitamin D was in the media this week; with Public Health England suggesting that everyone should take a supplement in the winter months due to the reduced sunlight.   One of the best ways to obtain this crucial vitamin is to be in the sun for about 10-15 minutes a day without sunscreen. so take a break at lunchtime and go for a quick walk, spend some time in the garden, walk the dog or take the children to the park.  All those activities done without sunscreen for 10 minutes should help your body to make Vitamin D.  After all it’s called the sunshine vitamin! 

* Unrefined grains such as wholemeal bread, pasta and rice, are high in phytates, which can block zinc absorption

1 COMMENT

  1. I get asked many times where vegans get their protein from if they don’t eat eggs and dairy. The answer is easy – nuts, seeds, beans and pulses, quinoa, vegan quorn, tofu and other soya products. So don’t let that stop you from trying more vegan dishes maybe once or twice a week

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