Find out how your Nottingham area school ranked in GCSE 2017 results here

The West Bridgford School achieved a 60.2 Attainment 8 score and Rushcliffe School a 57.6 score – both ‘well above average’ in the Government’s ‘Overall performance at end of key stage 4 in 2017 – all pupils’ figures released today. Check your school, see figures for different types of learning and local authority reaction here. 

The West Bridgford School scored 77% of pupils achieving Grade 5 or above in English & maths GCSEs, and Rushcliffe School 66%.

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Attainment 8                      

*Schools get a score based on how well pupils have performed in up to 8 qualifications, which include English, maths, 3 English Baccalaureate qualifications including sciences, computer science, history, geography and languages, and 3 other additional approved qualifications.

CHECK ALL SCHOOLS IN NOTTINGHAMSHIRE HERE

Responding to final, verified data published today (Thursday, 25 January) by the Department for Education showing how pupils in individual schools, academies and colleges across all 151 English local authority areas performed this year at GCSE and A-level and equivalent qualifications,  Nottinghamshire County Council’s children and young people’s committee chairman, Councillor Philip Owen said:

“It is very encouraging that nearly half of Nottinghamshire students achieved a ‘strong’ pass at GCSE in English and maths combined, putting the county ahead of the national average and placing Nottinghamshire in the top third of local authorities across the country.”1

“It is, however, difficult to make comparisons with the 2016 results as syllabuses and the way grades are awarded have significantly changed.”2

A ‘strong’ pass is grade 9 to 5 in English and maths.

And in terms of those achieving a ‘standard’ pass and above at GCSE in combined English and maths – grades 9 to 4 – results for the county are broadly in line with last year’s and slightly ahead when compared to the national picture. This measure puts Nottinghamshire at 54th in the national rankings.3

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“At the strong pass Nottinghamshire is placed second when compared with the 11 most similar local authorities and third at the standard pass,” continued Coun Owen.

“As a council, we will continue to monitor results as the new syllabuses and grades settle down to ensure that Nottinghamshire pupils are not losing out or being held back on academic opportunities. When we see the Regional Schools Commissioner4 next month, we will address issues that have arisen following the 2016/17 results.

“In contrast, the results at A-level and equivalent (Key Stage 5) for schools, academies and colleges across Nottinghamshire continue to be very disappointing and are clearly not acceptable.

“As nearly all of Nottinghamshire’s secondary schools are now academies, they are no longer under our control, but are the direct responsibility of the Department for Education and the Regional Schools Commissioner (RSC) who is responsible for the performance of academies.

 

“We will work closely with the RSC to see what the issues are and how the schools, academies and colleges can make improvements. Indeed, myself and members of the children and young people’s committee will be meeting with the Commissioner in February and underperformance will be top of the agenda.

 

“It is imperative that some fresh and radical thinking is brought to the issue. We can’t have a situation where underperformance at this stage of a students’ education potentially handicaps their future career options.”

MORE INFORMATION

  • 45.5% of Nottinghamshire students achieved a ‘strong’ pass in GCSE English and maths combined, putting the county ahead of the national average (42.9%) and placing Nottinghamshire 44th out of 151 local authorities.
  • There have been a number of changes to the way in which GCSE (Key Stage 4) results are reported this year.  New, more challenging GCSEs in English language, English literature and mathematics (taught in schools from September 2015) are reported in a new grading scale of 9 to 1, with 9 being the top grade (not A*-G as previously reported).  These three subjects are the first to use the new grading structure.  Eventually all GCSEs taken in England will receive numerical grades.

    Broadly the same proportion of students will achieve a grade 4 or better as previously achieved a grade C or above but instead of the four grades (A*, A, B and C) which most students achieve, the new grading structure will have six grades (9, 8, 7, 6, 5 and 4).  Fewer grade 9s will be awarded than A*s.

    Grade 4 will be regarded as a ‘standard pass’ and a grade 5 as a ‘strong pass’ with both measures published in school performance tables.  The government wants to see the percentage of pupils achieving a grade 5 and above rising over time and to reflect this ambition, achievement at the ‘strong pass’ will be one of the benchmarks used to measure the performance of schools.

  • In terms of those achieving a ‘standard’ pass and above (65.9%) in GCSE combined English and maths – grades 9 to 4 – results for the county are in line with last year’s and slightly ahead when compared to the national picture where 64.2% of pupils achieved standard passes. This measure puts Nottinghamshire at 54th in the national rankings out of 151 local authorities.