Rushcliffe late stage lung cancer diagnoses among the highest in Notts

Data from The Office of National Statistics shows that Rushcliffe has among the highest number of late stage lung cancer patients in Nottinghamshire.

Public Health England said,

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‘Breaking one year lung cancer survival down to Clinical Commissioning Group geographies, three of the five worst performing East Midlands Cancer Alliance CCGs are from the Nottinghamshire STP.

These were NHS Nottingham City CCG,  NHS Nottingham North and East CCG and NHS Rushcliffe CCG.’

  • In Nottinghamshire, our investigation has highlighted a lack of evidence as to the underlying drivers to this trend as there are no significant clinical variations in treatment or care which immediately explain this local variation. However we have identified that there is a higher rate of emergency admissions in Nottingham City than in surrounding areas and a higher proportion of late (stage 4) cases diagnosed in Rushcliffe. Both of these issues are the focus of further analysis locally and point to the fact that a whole pathway approach to raising awareness of lung cancer symptoms is required to support the improvement of outcomes.
  • At East Midlands level the East Midlands Cancer Alliance has made lung cancer one of its top priorities areas to continue to improve treatment and care pathways.

 

 

Public Health England (PHE) East Midlands has launched a ‘Be Clear on Cancer’ campaign in Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City urging people to see a doctor if they are getting out of breath doing things they used to be able to do or if they’ve had a cough for three weeks or more.

The latest data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) shows that lung cancer continues to be our biggest cancer killer responsible for in excess of 500 deaths a year in Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City.

Furthermore, the proportion of people surviving one-year after diagnosis locally is also below the England average.

PHE East Midlands estimates that the gap between the national average and locally equated to approximately 50 potentially avoidable deaths in the 2011- 2014 period. That is, those deaths that may not have occurred had the percentage of people surviving after one year been the same as the England rate in those years.

PHE East Midlands has been leading investigative analysis, in partnership with the Directors of Public Health at Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County Councils, the Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust to investigate and take action to improve lung cancer survival.

To support this approach, PHE East Midlands agreed to lead, on behalf of the partner organisations, a health promotion campaign to drive awareness of the signs and symptoms of lung cancer and encourage people to see their GP early.

The key message for the public is simple – if you get out of breath doing things you used to be able to do or you’ve had a cough for three weeks or more, it could be a sign of lung disease, including cancer. Finding it early makes it more treatable. So don’t ignore it, tell your doctor.

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The campaign is aimed at men and women aged 50 and above but also calls on people to look out for each other and encourage friends and family to visit the GP if they spot that they are breathless or have a persistent cough. It also aims to reassure individuals that they would not be wasting their GP’s time by getting their symptoms checked out.

Matt Day, Consultant in Healthcare Public Health and Cancer Lead for PHE East Midlands said:
“Lung cancer continues to be our biggest cancer killer in the East Midlands and locally in Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City and we want to ensure that people and families affected by lung cancer locally and across the East Midlands experience the improvements in survival rates which we have seen nationally in recent years.

“We have been reviewing the available data to determine if there are any reasons why the Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City populations are experiencing lower survival rates than expected. There remains a lack of evidence as to the underlying drivers to this trend as there are no significant clinical variations in treatment or care which immediately explain this local variation. However we have identified that there is a higher rate of emergency admissions in Nottingham City than in surrounding areas and a higher proportion of late (stage 4) cases diagnosed in Rushcliffe. Both of these issues are the focus of further analysis and action.

“Because of this it is vitally important that people recognise the symptoms of lung cancer as going to the doctor promptly can lead to an earlier diagnosis when these conditions are more treatable. Coughing for three weeks or more or becoming breathless doing things you used to be able to do, could be a sign of something serious, so it is important to get them checked out.”

Dr Arun Tangri, GP at Riverlyn Medical Centre in Bulwell, said:
“Earlier diagnosis saves lives. That’s why we’re committed to improving lung cancer survival rates in Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City. That is why the CCG’s and Local Authorities are expanding the lung health check programme this year.
“I would urge anyone who is concerned about symptoms, such as a persistent cough or shortness of breath, to please contact their local GP as soon as possible – they will want to see you.”

Bill a resident from Bulwell who was diagnosed with stage 1 lung cancer and had curative surgery, said:
“I’m so glad I went to the lung health check. It saved my life. My doctor said it’s given me 10 more years of life. If I hadn’t gone for that scan, I could be dead in a year’s time.”
Bill was one of the 1020 eligible patients identified in North Nottingham to benefit from a lung heath check. He was diagnosed with stage 1 lung cancer and had curative surgery.

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Thanks to donations from supporters, the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation is funding a third phase of Lung Health MOT Checks in Nottingham which aim to identify potential lung cancer patients before symptoms appear and before the cancer has advanced.

MORE INFORMATION

 

In 2016, 2,224  people died as a result of lung cancer in the East Midlands, making it the East Midlands biggest cancer killer.

  • Based on figures released by the Office for National Statistics, the percentage of patients surviving after both 1 and 5 years post diagnosis is below the England average, With one year net survival  for adults diagnosed with cancer of the lung between 2011 and 2015 37.6%, and five year survival at 14.1%. The England total for both measure which were 38.5% and 15.2% respectively.
  • The lowest performing Sustainable Transformation Plan (STP) geography in the East Midlands for 1-year survival was Lincolnshire STP with 35.8 % of patients alive one year after diagnosis. Nottinghamshire STP was second lowest for 1-year survival with 36.3 % of patients alive after 1-year and lowest overall for 5-year survival with 11.3% five year survival.
  • Nottinghamshire STP had a higher 1 year lung cancer survival rate than the England total between 2008 and 2010 however since then survival rates in Nottinghamshire have deteriorated up to 2014, making this geography a priority of public health action and investigation. This drop below the National trend equated to a survival gap of 3.9% in 2014 and 2.9% in 2015.
  • Breaking 1 year lung cancer survival down to Clinical Commissioning Group geographies, three of the five worst performing East Midlands Cancer Alliance CCG’s are from the Nottinghamshire STP. These were NHS Nottingham City CCG,  NHS Nottingham North and East CCG and NHS Rushcliffe CCG.
  • In Nottinghamshire, our investigation has highlighted a lack of evidence as to the underlying drivers to this trend as there are no significant clinical variations in treatment or care which immediately explain this local variation. However we have identified that there is a higher rate of emergency admissions in Nottingham City than in surrounding areas and a higher proportion of late (stage 4) cases diagnosed in Rushcliffe. Both of these issues are the focus of further analysis locally and point to the fact that a whole pathway approach to raising awareness of lung cancer symptoms is required to support the improvement of outcomes.
  • At East Midlands level the East Midlands Cancer Alliance has made lung cancer one of its top priorities areas to continue to improve treatment and care pathways.