Saturday 18 September 2021
12.2 C
Nottingham

Rushcliffe MP visits Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre near East Leake

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With Covid restrictions lifting, Rushcliffe MP Ruth Edwards paid a visit to the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (DMRC) at Stanford Hall near East Leake.

 

The DMRC, which provides medical care and rehabilitation to serving armed forces personnel, opened in 2018 and is one of the most state of the art armed forces medical facilities in the country.

Facilities include a swimming pool, multiple gymnasiums, outdoor amputee mobility rehabilitation areas and a state of the art research facility.

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Ruth met with Commanding Office Group Captain Chris Rowley and his team and was given both a briefing on the work of the DMRC and a tour of the hospital and the research institute.

In addition to watching physical rehabilitation classes and amputee mobility exercises, Ruth had the opportunity to talk with patients and staff about their time at Stanford Hall and the impact it was having on injured service personnel.

 

Ruth also met with Russ Coppack, the DMRC’s Clinical Research Manager and saw the ground breaking work he is doing to improve the effectiveness and quality of clinical rehabilitation.

Ruth was shown the largest clinical biomechanics performance lab in the UK and the world-leading Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN) trainer.

 

One of only seven similar facilities in the world, CAREN uses a combination of 3-D motion capture cameras and high-definition projectors to provide a fully immersive, virtual reality environment allowing simulation of a wide range of real-world situations.

 

Speaking after the visit, Ruth said:

 

“I was delighted to finally have the chance to visit the DMRC. Like so many other things, Covid has made it really difficult to get there safely before now.

 

This facility is fantastic. It was great to meet Group Captain Rowley and his team and to see the vital work they are doing, huge thanks to them all for giving up their time.  The rehab being done here is allowing many more serving personnel to get back into active service or to live their lives without constant pain.

 

I was also fascinated to see the ground-breaking research undertaken right here in Rushcliffe.  I will be shouting about their fantastic work to ministerial colleagues in Westminster and pushing for the Minister to visit as soon as it is possible to do so.”

 

Russ Coppack, the ADMR’s Research Mgr said:

 

“The ADMR delivers, develops & maintains a programme of class-leading research in order to promote continuous improvement in the effectiveness & quality of clinical rehabilitation at DMRC Stanford Hall & across the UK Defence Rehabilitation setting.

 

The current focus centres around trauma rehabilitation, musculoskeletal injury & COVID-19 research priorities. The ADVANCE study is a 20-year research programme investigating the long-term health outcomes of battle casualties & amputees injured during the IRAQ & Afghanistan campaigns. The Military COVID study will describe and report the medium to long-term complications of COVID in the UK Military population at risk (PAR). A programme of musculoskeletal injury research includes large pan-Defence studies investigating hip pain, tendon injuries and novel interventions.

 

ADMR enjoys access to world class research facilities including a physiology lab & the largest clinical biomechanics performance lab (BPL) in the UK. Facilities also include a high-end Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN) trainer. One of only seven similar facilities in the world, CAREN uses a combination of 3-D motion capture cameras and high-definition projectors to provide a fully immersive, virtual reality environment allowing simulation of a wide range of realistic visual and audible settings. Current and future research using the CAREN will explore its utility as a clinical intervention tool with the ongoing aim of incorporating this technology as a routine element of patient rehabilitation.”